Find us on Facebook Follow Ecofloors on Twitter
RSS

» View all Articles


» Our Top Selling Cork colour for 2014 - Flock Moonlight WRT Plank


» Coming soon RE/COVER green


» Recent renovation featuring Identity Moonlight...


» Wicanders Cork Flooring used in 20ft & 40ft Shipping Containers...


» Wicanders Cork Flooring receives GREEN TAG CERTIFIED


» Justin Timberlake dances on Vorwerk tiles...


» BNZ's New Flagship Store


» Vorwerk Freescale carpet tiles used at, The Barclay Center, Brooklyn, New York


» SCALE LIVING...designs you choose


» 2012-2015 New Carpet Range Tile Release from Toli


» Vorwerk FreeScale carpet tile to feature in new Christchurch IT Campus...


» Styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)


» Vorwerk Architectural News...


» SCALE LIVING, 2012 new release...

EcoFloors News

Styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)

Saturday March 17, 2012 17:40

Styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), a general-purpose synthetic rubber, produced from a copolymer of styrene and butadiene. Exceeding all other synthetic rubbers in consumption, SBR is used in great quantities in automobile and truck tires, generally as an abrasion-resistant replacement for natural rubber (produced from polyisoprene).

SBR is a mixture of approximately 75 percent butadiene (CH2=CH-CH=CH2) and 25 percent styrene (CH2=CHC6H5). In most cases these two compounds are copolymerized (their single-unit molecules linked to form long, multiple-unit molecules) in an emulsion process, in which a soaplike surface-acting agent disperses, or emulsifies, the materials in a water solution. Other materials in the solution include free-radical initiators, which begin the polymerization process, and stabilizers, which prevent deterioration of the final product. Upon polymerization, the styrene and butadiene repeating units are arranged in a random manner along the polymer chain. The polymer chains are cross-linked in the vulcanization process.

For many purposes SBR directly replaces natural rubber, the choice depending simply on economics. Its particular advantages include excellent abrasion resistance, crack resistance, and generally better aging characteristics. Like natural rubber, SBR is swollen and weakened by hydrocarbon oils and is degraded over time by atmospheric oxygen and ozone. In SBR, however, the main effect of oxidation is increased interlinking of the polymer chains, so, unlike natural rubber, it tends to harden with age instead of softening. The most important limitations of SBR are poor strength without reinforcement by fillers such as carbon black (although with carbon black it is quite strong and abrasion-resistant), low resilience, low tear strength (particularly at high temperatures), and poor tack (i.e., it is not tacky or sticky to the touch). These characteristics determine the use of the rubber in tire treads; essentially, its proportions decrease as the need for heat resistance increases until 100 percent natural rubber is reached in the heaviest and most severe uses, such as tires for buses and aircraft.

A large amount of SBR is produced in latex form as a rubbery adhesive for use in applications such as carpet backing. Other applications are in belting, flooring, wire and cable insulation, and footwear.

SBR is a product of synthetic rubber research that took place in Europe and the United States under the impetus of natural rubber shortages during World Wars I and II. By 1929 German chemists at IG Farben had developed a series of synthetic elastomers by copolymerizing two compounds in the presence of a catalyst. This series was called Buna,after butadiene, one of the copolymers, and sodium (natrium), the polymerization catalyst. During World War II the United States, cut off from its East Asian supplies of natural rubber, developed a number of synthetics, including a copolymer of butadiene and styrene. This general-purpose rubber, which had been called Buna S by German chemists Eduard Tschunkur and Walter Bock, who had patented it in 1933, was given the wartime designation GR-S (Government Rubber-Styrene) by the Americans, who improved upon its production. Subsequently known as SBR, this copolymer soon became the most important synthetic rubber, representing about one-half of the total world production.

Source… http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/570377/styrene-butadiene-rubber-SBR


Designed by Steve Sussex Design